Three Reasons Homebuyers Are Ready to Purchase This Year

A recent survey by Lending Tree tapped into behaviors of over 1,000 prospective buyers. The results indicated 53% of all homebuyers are more likely to buy a home in the next year, even amid the current health crisis. The survey further revealed why, naming several reasons buyers are more likely to move this year (see graph below):

Lynne MacFarlane's Blog, topic is why many buyers are likely to purchase in the next year

Let’s break down why these are a few of the key factors motivating buyers to actively engage in the home search process, and the corresponding wins for sellers as well.

1. Low Mortgage Rates

The biggest reason potential homebuyers indicated they’re eager to purchase this year is due to current mortgage rates, which are hovering near all-time lows. Today’s low rates are making it more affordable than ever to buy a home, which is a huge incentive for purchasers. In fact, 67% of respondents in the Lending Tree survey want to take advantage of low mortgage rates. This is no surprise when comparing historic mortgage rates by decade (see below):

Lynne MacFarlane Realtor Blog discusses historic interest rates by decade

Sam Khater, Chief Economist at Freddie Mac recently said:

“As the economy is slowly rebounding, all signs continue to point to a solid recovery in home sales activity heading into the summer as prospective buyers jump back into the market. Low mortgage rates are a key factor in this recovery.”

  1. Reduced Spending

Some people have also been able to save a little extra money over the past few months while sheltering in place. One of the upsides of staying home recently is that many have been able to work remotely and minimize extra spending on things like commuting expenses, social events, and more. For those who fall into this category, they may have a bit more saved up for down payments and closing costs, making purchasing a home more feasible today.

  1. Re-Evaluating Their Space

Spending time at home has also given buyers a chance to really evaluate their living space, whether renting or as a current homeowner. With time available to craft a wish list of what they really need in their next home, from more square footage to a more spacious neighborhood, they’re ready to make it happen.

What does this mean for buyers and sellers?

With these three factors in play, the demand for housing will keep growing this year, especially over the summer as more communities continue their phased approach to reopening. Buyers can take advantage of additional savings and low mortgage rates. And if you’re thinking of selling, know that your home may be in high demand as buyer interest grows and the number of homes for sale continues to dwindle. This may be your moment to list your house and make a move into a new space as well.

Bottom Line

If you’re ready to buy or sell – or maybe both – let’s connect to put your plans in motion. With low mortgage rates leading the way, it’s a great time to take advantage of your position in today’s market.

Give me a call at 831.346.2743 text/cell

lmacfarlane @ intero . com

Let me know if there’s anything I can do for you! 

 


Posted on June 16, 2020 at 7:04 pm
Lynne (Watanabe) MacFarlane | Posted in Buyers, Mortgage Rates, Real Estate | Tagged , , , , ,

Why Is So Much Paperwork Required to Get a Mortgage?

Why Is So Much Paperwork Required to Get a Mortgage?

When buying a home today, why is there so much paperwork mandated by the lenders for a mortgage loan application? It seems like they need to know everything about you. Furthermore, it requires three separate sources to validate each and every entry on the application form. Many buyers are being told by friends and family that the process was a hundred times easier when they bought their home ten to twenty years ago.

There are two very good reasons that the loan process is much more onerous on today’s buyer than perhaps any other time in history.

  1. The government has set new guidelines that now demand that the bank proves beyond any doubt that you are indeed capable of paying the mortgage.

During the run-up to the housing crisis, many people ‘qualified’ for mortgages that they could never pay back. This led to millions of families losing their home. The government wants to make sure this can’t happen again.

  1. The banks don’t want to be in the real estate business.

Over the last several years, banks were forced to take on the responsibility of liquidating millions of foreclosures and negotiating an additional million plus short sales. Just like the government, they don’t want more foreclosures. For that reason, they have to double (maybe even triple) check everything on the application.

However, there is some good news in this situation.

The housing crash that mandated that banks be extremely strict on paperwork requirements also allowed you to get a low mortgage interest rate.

The friends and family who bought homes ten or twenty years ago experienced a simpler mortgage application process, but also paid a higher interest rate (the average 30-year fixed rate mortgage was 8.12% in the 1990s and 6.29% in the 2000s).

If you went to the bank and offered to pay 7% instead of around 4%, they would probably bend over backward to make the process much easier.

Bottom Line

Instead of concentrating on the additional paperwork required, let’s be thankful that we are able to buy a home at historically low rates.


Posted on June 19, 2019 at 5:17 am
Lynne (Watanabe) MacFarlane | Posted in Mortgage Rates | Tagged

Mortgage Rates Decline – Great Time for Buyers to Come Back

If you were discouraged as a home buyer a year ago or were worried about interest rates going up, take a look again, and meet with your lender or if you don’t have one, feel free to contact me for a referral to help you prequalify. Prequalification is how lenders determine if you fit the basic financial criteria for a home loan. To get prequalified, you tell a lender some basic information about your credit, debt, income, and assets, and they tell you how much you may be able to borrow. There are higher inventory of homes on the market, and homes are longer days on market so this may be the perfect time for to make an offer.

According to the latest data released Thursday by Freddie Mac, the 30-year fixed-rate average tumbled to 3.99 percent with an average 0.5 point. (Points are fees paid to a lender equal to 1 percent of the loan amount and are in addition to the interest rate.) It was 4.06 percent a week ago and 4.56 percent a year ago. The 30-year fixed rate moved below 4 percent for the first time since January 2018.

U.S. weekly averages as of 05/30/2019 (from 05/30/2018 – 05/30/2019) from FreddieMac.com

U.S. weekly averages as of 05/30/2019 (05/30/2018 - 05/30/2019)

Bankrate.com, which puts out a weekly mortgage rate trend index, found that more than half of the experts it surveyed say rates will go down again in the coming week. I personally like to use Bankrate’s website to see mortgage comparisons at a glance, and they have informative articles on retirement, personal finance, home equity, etc… all good educational stuff.  I found through personal experience that the online lenders will often not give you personal attention and if you’re trying to buy a home in a competitive market, this may not always be the best choice. Sometimes local banks or brokerage, you’ll be able to contact them quickly and have your answer in minutes which is very important when applying for a mortgage. AND as SmartAsset states, rates aren’t always guaranteed: “Jumping on board with an online mortgage lender because they’re promising you a super low rate can backfire if it turns out that you’re not eligible for a great deal. By that point, you could be several weeks into the process, so you might feel like it’s too late to back out. And as a result, you could end up paying more for a mortgage than you had originally planned.” You’ll want a smooth escrow so do your research upfront, find out if there are hidden fees the lender charges for processing and funding the loan.

Let me know if I can help introduce you to lenders. I can introduce you to get you started started.

Lynne


Posted on June 1, 2019 at 5:17 pm
Lynne (Watanabe) MacFarlane | Posted in Articles, Buyers, Mortgage Rates | Tagged ,

3 Graphs that Show What You Need to Know About Today’s Real Estate Market

The best way to show what’s really going on in today’s real estate market is to go straight to the data! We put together the following three graphs along with a quote from Chief Economists that have their finger on the pulse of what each graph illustrates.

Interest Rates:

“The real estate market is thawing in response to the sustained decline in mortgage rates and rebound in consumer confidence – two of the most important drivers of home sales. Rising sales demand coupled with more inventory than previous spring seasons suggests that the housing market is in the early stages of regaining momentum.” – Sam Khater, Chief Economist at Freddie Mac

Income:

“A powerful combination of lower mortgage rates, more inventory, rising income and higher consumer confidence is driving the sales rebound.” – Lawrence Yun, Chief Economist at NAR

Home Prices:

“Price growth has been too strong for several years, fueled in part by abnormally low interest rates. A mild deceleration in home sales and Home Price Index growth is actually healthy, because it will calm excessive price growth — which has pushed many markets, particularly in the West, into overvalued territory.” – Ralph DeFranco, Global Chief Economist at Arch Capital Services Inc.

Bottom Line

These three graphs indicate good news for the spring housing market! Interest rates are low, income is rising, and home prices have experienced mild deceleration over the last 9 months. If you are considering buying a home or selling your house, let’s get together to chat about our market!


Posted on April 5, 2019 at 7:53 pm
Lynne (Watanabe) MacFarlane | Posted in Mortgage Rates, Real Estate | Tagged , , ,